“MISERY & MERCY” –St. Faustina

              “Human kind cannot bear very much reality.”  I read this line in T. S. Eliot’s “Four Quartets,” a poem, nearly 50 years ago.  As a matter of fact, I wrote my master’s thesis on the poem—so I remember pouring over these lines, trying to divine Eliot’s often obscure meanings.  Parts of lines often come to my mind, but I have come to know that this one expresses a great spiritual truth.  Human kind does everything to avoid facing reality: drugs, alcohol, sex, progressively deteriorating entertainment, mindless media, mindless eating—how far and how deep do we really want to go?

In silence and solitude, we cannot escape ourselves, for this is our most basic reality.  To enter reality is to enter self-knowledge; and that is to enter misery. I remember well what I read in St. Faustina’s diary: if God were to give me the full revelation of who and what I am in a  full, instant disclosure of self-knowledge, I would be terrified. However, knowing my misery, God has such tenderness for how such a revelation would affect me, would destroy me, that He gives me self-knowledge in tiny doses, gradually revealing to me the absolute depths of my unique misery.  Even so, occasional events devastate me when I catch a glimpse of myself as He sees me.

In a recent retreat, I meditated on misery with my brothers and sisters.  Until I begin to fathom the depths of my own misery, until I begin to enter self-knowledge, I cannot begin to understand who and what God is, His astonishing mercy.

What is this misery?  Years ago I entered into several deep reflections on original sin—a great place for anyone to start.  We all know we were born in original sin, inheriting our fallen nature from Adam and Eve.  Do you remember what its affects are on “human kind”?  Original sin produces a darkened intellect, a weakened will, and disunity between the soul and the body.  Here is where we start.  Now compound the misery by adding the wounds of personal sin, our own and the wounds we receive from others’ sins, the faults and habits we cannot give up, the vices, etc.  As years pass, we often find ourselves entrenched in these disordered tendencies.  Even as we struggle to gain the habits of virtue, we fall often, and sometimes severely.

St. Paul bemoaned this condition in Romans:

18 And really, I know of nothing good living in me — in my natural self, that is — for though the will to do what is good is in me, the power to do it is not:

19 the good thing I want to do, I never do; the evil thing which I do not want — that is what I do.

20 But every time I do what I do not want to, then it is not myself acting, but the sin that lives in me.

21 So I find this rule: that for me, where I want to do nothing but good, evil is close at my side.

22 In my inmost self I dearly love God’s law,

23 but I see that acting on my body there is a different law which battles against the law in my mind. So I am brought to be a prisoner of that law of sin which lives inside my body.

24 What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body doomed to death?

25 God — thanks be to him — through Jesus Christ our Lord. So it is that I myself with my mind obey the law of God, but in my disordered nature I obey the law of sin.”

How does baptism affect original sin and our fallen nature?  The Catholic Catechism teaches us:

1263 By Baptism all sins are forgiven, original sin and all personal sins, as well as all punishment for sin. In those who have been reborn nothing remains that would impede their entry into the Kingdom of God, neither Adam’s sin, nor personal sin, nor the consequences of sin, the gravest of which is separation from God.

1264 Yet certain temporal consequences of sin remain in the baptized, such as suffering, illness, death, and such frailties inherent in life as weaknesses of character, and so on, as well as an inclination to sin that Tradition calls concupiscence, or metaphorically, “the tinder for sin” (fomes peccati); since concupiscence “is left for us to wrestle with, it cannot harm those who do not consent but manfully resist it by the grace of Jesus Christ.” Indeed, “an athlete is not crowned unless he competes according to the rules.”

            The saints were not free of this misery, either.  If they entered into self-knowledge—and they certainly did—then they experienced the same great depth of human misery that we all experience.  St. Faustina uses the word misery 115 times in her diary.  She tells us:

[56]“…from the beginning I have been aware of my weakness. I know very well what I am of myself, because for this purpose Jesus has opened the eyes of my soul; I am an abyss of misery, and hence I understand that whatever good there is in my soul consists solely of His holy grace. The knowledge of my own misery allows me, at the same time, to know the immensity of Your mercy. In my own interior life, I am looking with one eye at the abyss of my misery and baseness, and with the other, at the abyss of Your mercy, O God.”

St. Faustina also gives us the key to joy in our misery!  Because in us “deep calls unto deep”—deep misery calls to deeper mercy.     She writes:

[66]“Truly, Jesus, I become frightened when I look at my own misery, but at the same time I am reassured by Your unfathomable mercy, which exceeds my misery by the measure of all eternity. This disposition of soul clothes me in Your power. O joy that flows from the knowledge of one’s self!”

Long before St. Faustina or any of the saints, Mary, the Blessed Mother herself, taught us this joy in her Magnificat:  “He has filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he has sent empty away.”  The very depth of our misery is an abyss of hunger for goodness which only His mercy can fill.  Only the truly poor in spirit can be filled with the riches of His mercy. If we do not acknowledge or even know our misery, we are the rich which He sends empty away.  How foolish we are to hide behind our pride, our false wealth, our masks, our claims that we are perfectly fine, that we don’t need anything—thank you very much!

Let us reflect and pray with St. Faustina:

“69 (29) + O Jesus, eternal Truth, strengthen my feeble forces; You can do all things, Lord. I know that without You all my efforts are in vain. O Jesus, do not hide from me, for I cannot live without You. Listen to the cry of my soul, Your mercy has not been exhausted, Lord, so have pity on my misery.”

“[52] God demands great purity of certain souls, and so He gives them a deeper knowledge of their own misery. Illuminated by light from on high, the soul can better know what pleases God and what does not.”

“[113] Pride keeps it [the soul] in darkness. The soul neither knows how, nor is it willing, to probe with precision the depths of its own misery. It puts on a mask and avoids everything that might bring it recovery.”

“283 I want to love You as no human soul has ever loved You before; and although I am utterly miserable and small, I have, nevertheless, cast the anchor of my trust deep down into the abyss of Your mercy, O my God and Creator! In spite of my great misery I fear nothing, but hope to sing You a hymn of glory for ever.”

“289 My happiest moments are when I am alone with my Lord. During these moments I experience the greatness of God and my own misery.”

“[346]  Suddenly, I heard these words: You are My delightful dwelling place; My Spirit rests in you. After these words, I felt the Lord looking into the depths of my heart; and seeing my misery, I humbled myself in spirit and admired the immense mercy of God, that the Most High Lord would approach such misery.”

“363 O good Jesus, thank You for the great grace of making known to me what I am of myself: misery and sin, and nothing more. I can do only one thing of myself, and that is to offend You, O my God, because misery can do no more of itself than offend You, O infinite Goodness!”

“[411] …I thought I would die of joy. At such times, my knowledge of God and his attributes becomes more acute, and also I know my own self and my misery much better. I am amazed at the Lord’s great condescension to such a miserable soul as mine.”

“435] Then I heard these words: Do not fear; I Myself will make up for everything that is lacking in you. But these words penetrated me to my depths and made me even more aware of my misery, and I understood that the word of the Lord is living and that it penetrates to the very depths. I understood that God demands a more perfect way of life of me. However, I kept using my incompetence as an excuse.”

593 O my Jesus, nothing is better for the soul than humiliations. In contempt is the secret of happiness, when the soul recognizes that, of itself, it is only wretchedness and nothingness, and that whatever it possesses of good is a gift of God. When the soul sees that everything is given it freely and that the only thing it has of itself is its own misery, this is what sustains it in a continual act of humble prostration before the majesty of God. And God, seeing the soul in such a disposition, pursues it with His graces. As the soul continues to immerse itself more deeply into the abyss of its nothingness and need, God uses His omnipotence to exalt it. If there is a truly happy soul upon earth, it can only be a truly humble soul. At first, one’s self-love suffers greatly on this account, but after a soul has struggled courageously. God grants it much light by which it sees how wretched and full of deception everything is. God alone is in its heart. A humble soul does not trust itself, but places all its confidence in God. God defends the humble soul and lets Himself into its secrets, and the soul abides in unsurpassable happiness which no one can comprehend.”

“[605] The Lord has inclined himself to my misery like a ray of the sun upon a barren and rocky desert. And yet, under the influence of His rays, my soul has become covered with verdure, flowers, and fruit, and has become a beautiful garden for His repose.”

“606 My Jesus, despite Your graces, I see and feel all my misery. I begin my day with battle and end it with battle. As soon as I conquer one obstacle, ten more appear (69) to take its place. But I am not worried, because I know that this is the time of struggle, not peace. When the burden of the battle becomes too much for me, I throw myself like a child into the arms of the heavenly Father and trust I will not perish. O my Jesus, how prone I am to evil, and this forces me to be constantly vigilant. But I do not lose heart. I trust God’s grace, which abounds in the worst misery.

“672  His justice pervades me to the marrow; outwardly I lose strength and consciousness. With this, I come to know the great holiness of God and my own great misery. A great torment affects my soul; the soul perceives its deeds to be not without blemish. Then the strength of trust is awakened in the soul, which longs for God with all its might. Yet is sees how miserable it is and what utter vanity everything that surrounds it. And face to face with such holiness, Oh, poor soul…”

“718 After Holy Communion, I heard these words:- You see what you are of yourself, but do not be frightened at this. If I were to reveal to you the whole misery that you are, you would die of terror. However, be aware of what you are. Because you are such great misery, I have revealed to you the whole ocean of My mercy. I seek and desire souls like yours, but they are few. Your great trust in Me forces Me to continuously grant you graces. You have great and incomprehensible rights over My Heart, for you are a daughter of complete trust. You would not have been able to bear the magnitude of the love which I have for you if I had revealed it to you fully here on earth. I often give you a glimpse of it, but know that this is only an exceptional grace from Me. My love and mercy knows no bounds.”

“723  …your heart is My constant dwelling place, despite the misery that you are. I unite Myself with you, take away your misery and give you My mercy. I perform works of mercy in every soul. The greater the sinner, the greater the right he has to My mercy.”

“852 (232) Today the Lord’s gaze shot through me suddenly, like lightning. At once, I came to know the tiniest specks in my soul, and knowing the depths of my misery, I fell to my knees and begged the Lord’s pardon, and with great trust I immersed myself in His infinite mercy. Such knowledge does not depress me nor keep me away from the Lord, but rather it arouses in my soul greater love and boundless trust. The repentance of my heart is linked to love. These extraordinary flashes from the Lord educate my soul. O sweet rays of God, enlighten me to the most secret depth, for I want to arrive at the greatest possible purity of heart and soul.”

1182 (50) + Today the Lord said to me, My daughter, My pleasure and delight, nothing will stop me from granting you graces. Your misery does not hinder my mercy. My daughter, write that the greater the misery of a soul, the greater its right to My mercy; [urge] all souls to trust in the unfathomable abyss of My mercy, because I want to save them all.

“1273 Jesus: My daughter, do you think you have written enough about My mercy? What you have written is but a drop compared to the ocean. I am Love and Mercy Itself. There is no misery that could be a match for My mercy, neither will misery exhaust it, because as it is being granted – it increases. The soul that trusts in My mercy is most fortunate, because I Myself take care of it.”

“1318 Jesus said to me, My daughter, you have not offered Me that which is really yours. I probed deeply into myself and found that I love God with all the faculties of my soul and, unable to see what it was that I had not yet given to the Lord, I asked, ‘Jesus, tell me what it is, and I will give it to You at once with a generous heart.’ Jesus said to me with kindness, Daughter, give Me your misery, because it is your exclusive property. At that moment, a ray of light illumined my soul, and I saw the whole abyss of my misery. In that same moment I nestled close to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus with so much trust that even if I had the sins of all the damned weighing on my conscience, I would not have doubted God’s mercy but, with a heart crushed to dust, I would have thrown myself into the abyss of Your mercy.”

“1485I let my Sacred Heart be pierced with a lance, thus opening wide the source of mercy for you. Come, then, with trust to draw graces from this fountain. I never reject a contrite heart. Your misery has disappeared in the depths of My mercy. Do not argue with Me about your wretchedness. You will give me pleasure if you hand over to me all your troubles and griefs. I shall heap upon you the treasures of My grace.”

“1602 If their trust is great, there is no limit to My generosity. The torrents of grace inundate humble souls. The proud remain always in poverty and misery, because My grace turns away from them to humble souls.”

“1775 Jesus said, For you, I am mercy itself; therefore I ask you to offer Me your misery and this very helplessness of yours and, in this way, you will delight My Heart.”

 

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The Passion of Jesus and Mary for Lent

As we enter Lent in a few days, we need to spend some time contemplating the Passion, perhaps with the Stations of the Cross of St. Faustina.

Wonderful promises are also available to those who take a few minutes each day to reflect on the Sorrows of Mary [youtube video]. 

With the following powerpoint, say a Hail Mary after each reflection as you gaze at the beautiful icon of her sorrow.

SEVEN SORROWS OF MARY

 

These are the seven promises Our Lady made, through St. Bridget of Sweden, to those who are devoted to meditating on her Seven Sorrows:

1. “I will grant peace to their families.”

2. “They will be enlightened about the Divine Mysteries.”

3. “I will console them in their pains and I will accompany them in their work.”

4. “I will give them as much as they ask for as long as it does not oppose the adorable will of my Divine Son or the sanctification of their souls.”

5. “I will defend them in their spiritual battles with the infernal enemy and I will protect them at every instant of their lives.”

6. “I will visibly help them at the moment of their death. They will see the face of their Mother.”

7. “I have obtained this grace from my divine Son, that those who propagate this devotion to my tears and dolors, will be taken directly from this earthly life to eternal happiness since all their sins will be forgiven and my Son and I will be their eternal consolation and joy.”

Additionally, as relayed by St. Alphonsus de Liguori in his classic work The Glories of Mary, Our Lord promised four graces to those devoted to the Sorrows of his Blessed Mother:

1. That those who before death invoke the divine Mother in the name of Her Sorrows will obtain true repentance of all their sins;

2. That He will protect all who have this devotion in their tribulations, and will protect them especially at the hour of death;

3.  That He will impress on their minds the remembrance of His Passion;

4. That He will place such devout servants in Mother Mary’s hands to do with them as She wishes and to obtain for them all the graces She desires.

“Jesus, Radiance of the Father”

I looked but cannot find where I read last night,  “The Father spoke one Word….”  I would rather say, “The Father speaks one Word,” because He speaks His Word eternally, “as it was in the beginning, is now, and forever will be….” During Adoration, this innocent sentence suddenly exploded in my consciousness, for I heard the Father speak “JESUS” and radiance permeated ALL—the untold stars and galaxies bleeding the light of time, millions of trees exulting in green praise, with so many creatures—from the invisible microbes to the majestic sea creatures swarming the great deep seas, mountains rushing to break through the crust of the earth, and the waters—the rushing, glad waters of earth, and the people, all the souls tenderly fashioned in love… All explosions of light pouring through the eternal Word, this one Word of the Father made flesh in Jesus!

I cannot get over this—this “procession of the Trinity” which amazes me and intrigues me every time I think of it.  How can I say it so you can begin to realize the wonder of it? I continually try to uncover for myself some little aspect of this procession of the eternal Word from the Father, because I can’t get my head or my heart around it.  Jesus is the Plenitude of the expression of the Father’s essence. There is nothing that the Father is that is not totally expressed and radiated by Jesus in His divinity.

I found online that St. John of the Cross wrote in his MAXIMS AND COUNSELS:  “21. The Father spoke one Word, which was His Son, and this Word He always speaks in eternal silence, and in silence must It be heard by the soul.”

St. Paul tells us in Colossians:  He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation, for in Him were created all things in heaven and on earth, the visible and the invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers; all things were created through Him and for Him.

“He is before all things, and in Him all things hold together….” [Col. 1: 15-16]  And a little later:  “the word of God, the mystery hidden from ages and from generations past.  But now it has been manifested to his holy ones, to whom God chose to make known the riches of the glory of this mystery…it is Christ in you, the hope for glory.”  [Col. 1: 25-27]

While praying late one night several years ago, the Holy Spirit gave me this sentence:  “Jesus is the Outpouring of the Father’s Heart.” I wrote a post on this sentence three years ago.  I was then astounded and so unbelievably touched because I understood for the first time that Jesus is the Revelation of the Sacred Heart of the Father. I wrote then:

Several months ago I was reading one of Father George A. Maloney’s books, Abiding in the Indwelling Trinity….“His baptism would be of water and blood poured out from his loving heart, the heart of the suffering God imaged in Jesus“   [p. 86].  What we have here suddenly is an image of the Sacred Heart of the Father!  “For the contemplative Christian, poor in spirit and pure of heart, the complete self-emptying (kenosis) even to the last drop of blood and water has fullest meaning only in being an exact image of the heart of God the Father in his infinite, tender, self-sacrificing love for all of us.”  [p. 87] The Father is not incarnate; only Jesus has a human heart which undergoes the baptism of fire–but the Heart of Jesus is the Incarnation of the Will of the Father, the Heart of the Father, if you will.  Just as Jesus told Philip,  “Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father” [John 14:9], to know the Sacred Heart of Jesus is to know the Sacred Heart of the Father.”

The mysteries of the Blessed Trinity leave us breathless, speechless, lost in astonished humility. If we are faithful, the Holy Spirit has a way of striking us in the heart with a simple word from the Heart of the Mystery that sets us on fire, that drops us to our knees, prostrate with adoration. That word can come from nature, from a talk, from Scripture, from a saint, from a book—from literally anywhere.  As St. John of the Cross tells us:  “and this Word He always speaks in eternal silence, and in silence must It be heard by the soul.”

[See also “Our Sins are Burned Away by the Light of Jesus”]

 

“These eyes will behold…”

Near the end of my rosary this morning before Mass, as I gazed at the Tabernacle, these words came to my mind, brought to me by the Holy Spirit:  “These eyes will behold the Glory!” The Glory of Christ, of the Blessed Trinity—all that awaits us in Heaven!  These physical eyes of mine that gaze at the Tabernacle, at the wonder of the Eucharist, our Bread Who has come down from Heaven will still be my eyes in Heaven!

The same eyes that I use in Adoration, in my home, in the streets, in watching television….  I realized how precious is the purity of our eyes.  How critical that we “guard our eyes.”  The Fathers of the Church have much to say about “custody of the eyes.”

I read online:  “At its most basic level, custody of the eyes simply means controlling what you allow yourself to see. It means guarding your sense of sight carefully, realizing that what you view will leave an indelible mark on your soul.

 “Many of the saints, in their zeal for purity, would never look anyone in the face. ‘To avoid the sight of dangerous objects, the saints were accustomed to keep their eyes almost continually fixed on the earth, and to abstain even from looking at innocent objects,’ says St. Alphonsus de Liguori.” [https://www.catholicgentleman.net/2014/06/custody-of-the-eyes-what-it-is-and-how-to-practice-it/]

Sam Guzman, the author, offers many practical suggestions as to how to maintain custody of the eyes, so difficult in today’s world.

I am a rather solitary person, but I have had an experience recently while watching television which has prompted me to sharply reduce the amount of time and what I watch.  As I viewed a movie, suddenly erotic scenes erupted before me.  To my shame, I was caught off-guard and did not turn away.  This failure I had to bring to confession.  Because we never know when such scenes may rise, we need to be prudent and eliminate all possibilities.  Safest to watch older films which never tread on purity or engage in content offensive to faith.

“If your eye offends you, pluck it out.” – Jesus

 “The thought follows the look; delight comes after the thought; and consent after delight.”  -Saint Augustine – Bishop of Hippo, Father, and Doctor of the Church

 “Oh! how many are lost by indulging their sight!”  – St. Alphonsus de Ligouri

“The eyes, because they draw us to sin, must be depressed. He that looks at a dangerous object begins to will what he wills not.”-Pope Saint Gregory the Great, Father and Doctor of the Church, Mor. J. 21, c. 2.

Sister Maria Catherine, O.P. asks us: “What am I thinking about all day long? What am I putting into my mind to nourish it? Monastic writers discuss a practice called “custody of the eyes,” at length. These wise fathers in the faith encourage me to discipline my eyes. When I’m driving along the highway, do I have to look at every billboard? When I go grocery shopping, do I dwell on a Kardashian gracing the cover of People?

 “My mind needs something life-giving to feast on. Paul emphasizes this, when he says, “Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious if there is any excellence or anything worthy of praise, think about these things” (Philippians 4:8). How do I find more of these things to dwell on? A twofold approach could be helpful: Where am I wasting time on frivolous images?  What am I reading? What do I listen to? Minimizing the time spent on what doesn’t lead me to God, will help me to make room for the things that will deepen my relationship with Christ and open my heart to what is truly restorative. ”  [http://www.catholic-sf.org/CSF-home/voices/article/csf/2017/01/01/practicing-custody-of-the-eyes]

As with the eyes, so with the ears; and equally, with the tongue.

Last night as I listened to Marino Restrepo,  Catholic Evangelist from Colombia, he advised that the first thing that we should do when we rise in the morning is to “consecrate our tongue to the Lord,” for custody of the tongue is equally important.  Even in the Old Testament, we read:  “Set a watch, Lord, beside my mouth and a door about my lips.” [Psalm 38:1]  The same tongue that we use daily to talk to our family, to visit with co-workers, will be the same tongue with which we will adore the Holy Trinity for all eternity.

St. James cautions us about the use of our tongues: “So the tongue is a little member and boasts of great things. How great a forest is set ablaze by a small fire! And the tongue is a fire.” [James 3:5-6]

What is obvious is all the sins, venial and mortal, which we commit with the tongue, sins against charity, patience, even purity.  What is not so obvious is the seriousness of the wasteful and idle words we speak.  Jesus told us in the New Testament:  “But I say unto you, that every idle word that men shall speak, they shall render an account for it in the day of judgment.” [Matthew 12:36] This “idle” has alternately been translated as “careless,” “thoughtless,” “empty,” and “worthless.”  Mea Culpa. This teaching of Jesus has always struck me with a pang of dread and fear. Which of us has not been guilty of idle talk often, if not constantly?

In the midst of His teachings in the discourse on the Beatitudes, Jesus tells us:  “Let your ‘Yes’ mean ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No’ mean ‘No.’ Anything more is from the evil one.”   [Matthew 5:37] Jesus urges no subterfuge, duplicity, dishonesty, but purity in speech, simplicity, and transparency. I see in His words also an urgency to paucity, not to multiply words, but to respect silence as an option in many situations, with many people.

As we approach Lent, let us seriously consider working on custody of the eyes, ears, or tongue—wherever we most grievously offend our Lord.

“What is the Glory of God?” – St. Elizabeth of the Trinity

During a spiritual conversation with another Carmelite nun one day, St. Elizabeth was struck by a scripture of St. Paul which the older nun shared with her:  “praise of glory.”  The phrase occurs three times in succession in Ephesians 1:

Verse 5-6: “In love he destined us for adoption to himself through Jesus Christ, in accord with the favor of his will, for the praise of the glory of his grace that he granted us in the Beloved.”

 Ephesians 11-12 :  “In him we were also chosen, destined in accord with the purpose of the One who accomplishes all things according to the intention of his will, so that we might exist for the praise of his glory….”

 Ephesians 3:13-14 – “In him you also, who have heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and have believed in him, were sealed with the promised holy Spirit, which is the first installment of our inheritance toward redemption as God’s possession, to the praise of his glory.”

 Elizabeth was enthralled to discover her purpose, her vocation, her very name: “Laudem Gloriae,” Praise of Glory.  Years ago, as a young novice in my 20’s, I was equally enthralled.  But what is this glory?  I exist to praise His Glory,  so what is the glory of God?

This, Father M. M. Philipon, O. P. explains in his book:  THE SPIRITUAL DOCTRINE OF SISTER ELIZABETH OF THE TRINITY.  [He wrote the book long before her canonization.]  This excerpt from his book is so beautiful I will quote it in its entirety [bold emphases are mine]:

1.  What is the glory of God? The radiant manifestation of what He is, the revelation of His infinite perfections.

2. There are two kinds of glory in God: His personal glory within Himself, and His external glory in the universe He has created.  There is no question here of His essential glory, that glory which God finds in Himself, in His Word, in the unique eternal Thought which adequately expresses all that He is in the indivisible Unity of His Essence and the Trinity of the Persons.  The Word expresses everything:  the inexhaustible fecundity of the bosom of the Father, the beauty of the son, the Love that perfects Them in Unity, the universe which has come into being by their creative might and which remains in the hands of God like a plaything. Thus the Father manifests His own glory to the Son. The Father shines out in the Word, the image and splendor of His glory; the Word manifests to the Father all that He is in Himself.  In Him, the Father and the Son know the Eternal Love that unites them.  Such is the essential glory of God, that personal intra-Trinitarian glory which is the Word.

 3.  The universe adds nothing to this infinite glory, and before the Holy Trinity even the very soul of Christ must acknowledge its nothingness. In the three-fold society of the divine Persons and the indivisible unity of their Essence, God is sufficient to Himself.  All that can come to Him from without, even from Christ, is only accidental.  And yet, notwithstanding, God claims it absolutely, because the hierarchy of values and the order of creation so requires.  To the Creator belong honor, wisdom, power, and glory.

 4. …[Elizabeth] understood perfectly that she was bound to become a saint in the first place for God; and to become as great a saint as possible because His glory was closely linked with her sanctity….She understood that the higher a soul is raised on the summits of transforming union, the better it will fulfill its office of ‘Praise of Glory.’ God is glorified in the measure in which ‘the beauty’ of His perfections is reflected in souls…

 5. The glorified souls, those who contemplate God in the simplicity of His Essence, have attained to this supreme transformation. ‘Then I shall know even as I am known,’ says St. Paul, meaning by intuitive vision….That is why…they are ‘transformed into the same image from glory to glory, by the Spirit of the Lord.’ Then they are a ceaseless praise of glory to the divine Being Who contemplates his own splendor in them… ‘God created man to His own image.’

 6.   Such was the plan of the Creator, that He might view Himself in His creature, and might see His own perfections and beauty reflected through him as through a pure and flawless crystal. Is that not a kind of extension of His own glory?

 7.  The soul…that allows the Divinity to reflect Himself in it…such a soul is truly the ‘Praise of Glory’ of all His gifts. Whatever happens, and during the most commonplace employments, it sings the canticum magnum [great canticle], the canticum novum [new canticle], and this canticle thrills God to His very depths.’ [pp. 90-91]

         No false humility in St. Elizabeth.  She determined to be a saint, and a great one, because nothing else would suffice to praise the essential glory of God.

         Several years ago I wrote another reflection, “A Plan to Praise His Glory.” In an emotional, ecstatic hour of Adoration, three years before I even read Fr. Philipon’s book, God gave me the grace to glimpse briefly what Fr. Philipon explains as the essential glory of God:

            “We tend to see the Glory of God as a static thing, brilliant Light, radiance, etc. such as Peter, James, and John saw to envelop Christ during the Transfiguration on Mt. Tabor. Yet we should realize that His Glory is intensely alive with Divine Energy, ecstatic and personal, throbbing with incomprehensible Love, deeply shared, pouring out from Divine Person to Divine Person eternally. His Glory is Delight, enthralling, enrapturing.” 

             Rather than using Fr. Philipon’s words, “essential,” and “accidental”, I explained then that “Glory is not extrinsic to God, but intrinsic—essentially His from all eternity. We cannot give Glory to God; He IS Glory. When we say, “Glorify God” or “Give glory to God” we are talking about the praise of His Glory, giving Him what is extrinsic to Him, incidental, nonessential. If we are pure and acceptable to Him in Christ, it is as though we are holding up a spotless mirror to reflect His Glory–we don’t increase it, but merely reflect it.” 

An old hymn “Holy, Holy, Holy” has always given me great joy, expressing so well the image of the eternal adoration by the angels and saints of the Trinity:

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!

Early in the morning our song shall rise to Thee;

Holy, holy, holy, merciful and mighty!

God in three Persons, blessed Trinity!

 

Holy, holy, holy! All the saints adore Thee,

Casting down their golden crowns around the glassy sea;

Cherubim and seraphim falling down before Thee,

Who was, and is, and evermore shall be.

             The line that always moved me was that of the saints casting down their gold crowns around the glassy sea.  Then the cherubim and seraphim falling down before Him—all in an ecstasy of adoration, in an extremity of prostration.  The “glassy sea” seemed a perfect mirror to  reflect His unspeakable light.  This kind of adoration was what I saw last Sunday morning.  An African woman, an immigrant from Sierra Leone, entered our church, went to the foot of the sanctuary, and in full view of the entire congregation, prostrated herself before Him, recognizing Him, laying her turbaned head on the lowest step, remaining for a long moment of singular adoration of the Blessed Trinity.

I wrote a post some time ago, “We are Underwhelmed by God.”  We are numb to Him.  We do not see.  We do not even genuflect well.  We flick our hands in trivial signs of the Cross. God forgive us.

Yet in paragraph 7 of Fr. Philipon’s excerpt, we read:  The soul…that allows the Divinity to reflect Himself in it…such a soul is truly the ‘Praise of Glory’ of all His gifts.  Whatever happens, and during the most commonplace employments, it sings the canticum magnum [great canticle], the canticum novum [new canticle], and this canticle thrills God to His very depths.’

             If we can be just a bit more mindful, if we take time for adoration on a regular basis, if we will prostrate ourselves in spirit, “whatever happens, and during the most commonplace employments,” our soul will sing the Canticum magnum, the Canticum novum—the new song of the Holy Spirit Who floods our entire being, “thrilling God to His very depths.” This is the song of the saints casting down their golden crowns in an ecstasy of adoration, the song of the cherubim and seraphim.  Even in the commonplace, the most ordinary and tedious moments of our lives, we will live adoring the intrinsic Glory of God, praising His Glory.

“Like a Bird to its Nest” – Sr. Ruth Burrows, O.C.D

Since Friday when I read this—the Gospel was on the Presentation in the Temple, and Simeon—and again today, Sunday, the same Gospel, this phrase has haunted me, charmed me, teased me.  The quotation comes from the reflection by Sr. Ruth Burrows, O.C.D. in the Magnificat magazine.  It begins:  “When his parents brought the Child Jesus into the Temple, Simeon held out his arms to receive him.  An old man stretches out for the Child; the Child comes to him like a bird to its nest.” Here is a picture of what can be, of what should be. He always comes to waiting arms.” [“Simeon’s Waiting Arms, p. 433]

Simeon is an old man.  He has been waiting for years, promised by the Holy Spirit that he would see the Salvation of Israel.  Did he know to wait for a child?  If not, then what?  The tent of his heart has been pulled, stretched, till his very body stretches to receive the Child, the desired One of all the ages, thousands of years.  His is the Salvation which Moses did not see, not Abraham, not Elijah, not Jeremiah in his bitter Lamentations or even Isaiah who told us that the virgin would be with child—Emmanuel, God with us.

Waiting in the Temple, when he sees this divine Baby, old man Simeon stretches his very heart, stretches out his arms,  longing to enfold the Desired One.  And what of Jesus?  Like a bird to its nest” the Child nestles in the old man’s arms. To the longing heart, Jesus has come home.

Sister Ruth continues:  “Let us ask him to show us how our arms are kept back from stretching towards him.  Let us begin all over again to live for him.  Simeon’s selflessness is an echo of Jesus’ selflessness.  Simeon and Jesus suit one another.  Both have one mind, one will.  This is what can be, what should be….”

We all know that if our arms are full of packages we cannot stretch them out to receive a baby.  No, it is only the empty arms, the stripped heart and will that can stretch out to receive the Christ.  But what a delight for the devout who wait like the ten wise virgins—their lamps full of oil for the coming of the bridegroom; for those who pray without ceasing by living with great love in the Temple of their ordinary lives; for those stretched in longing in the tedious, humdrum days of all their years; for those reaching for Jesus who comes with all the enthusiastic joy of a baby cooing and waving his precious little arms, launching Himself “like a bird to its nest” in our hearts.

Faith through Persecution – SILENCE, directed by Martin Scorsese

Flowing from the manger in Bethlehem and the radiance of the Christ Child, we have today the feast of the first martyr, St. Stephen—in true counterpoint.  I could not help but think of the film which I watched recently on Amazon prime, director Martin Scorcese’s SILENCE, 28 years in the making, his great passion and dream.

      This heart-piercing, soul-rending film explores in great depth the persecution of the faith, of both Christians and Catholics in Japan in 1633.  Purportedly about the apostate priests of the time, to me it renders better what faith is, the suffering and perseverance of these great martyrs, as well as the cunning cruelty of those who persecuted them, who used every trickery especially to make the priests, themselves, apostasize.  The film will stay with you long after you watch it.  It is most humbling.

 See also Scorsese’s dramatic interview on youtube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbYiGdinejU

CANTICLE of CANTICLES–St. Bernard of Clairvaux’s Sermons

Just a few days ago, I found a treasure online, a profound work by St. Bernard which I had never seen before.  However, the format of the files was so difficult to read that I was moved immediately to edit it myself, making it user friendly and scaled to fit on phone or tablet.  The Table of Contents is on p.. 16.  Pages are designated in blue; find titles in bold red.  Enjoy!

B-_ST_BERNARD_-Canticle_of_Canticles_Sermons

The Cloistered Heart – Nancy Shuman

Today I discovered a charming and deeply spiritual blog called “A Cloistered Heart.”  I can’t do it justice here without stealing some of Nancy’s thunder. Let me just quote this one little part:  “THE CLOISTERED HEART IS a way of living for God in the midst of the world. It is heart monasticism that can be embraced by married or single persons, religious or lay. It’s an analogy in which our lives can be “monasteries,” our hearts can live in the “enclosure” of Christ, and all things may be viewed through the will of God as through a “grille.”

This lovely mother and grandmother is a woman after my own heart!  One of her initial posts explains the cloistered heart in greater and more profound detail:  http://www.thecloisteredheart.org/2017/08/so-what-is-cloistered-heart.html

I return often to my own post, THE INNER CLOISTER OF FIAT–it’s the same idea which I captured from my beloved Conchita and of course, Love Crucified refers also to our “domestic monasteries.”

Enjoy her lovely artwork and the graphics.  She cites so well many of  the saints.  What a refreshing blog!

Pulse of the Holy Spirit

child playing in sand

The Holy Spirit has been much on my mind and in my prayer in the last couple of weeks.  Not only do I return to Him periodically, but I often write about Him because I don’t think we appreciate His great presence as we should.

In one of our Cenacles of Love Crucified, Pati told us that we should put a copy of our Covenant where we can see and pray it daily.  [Love Crucified is a Catholic covenant community, a community of lay men and women, husbands and wives in some cases, and ordained priests and deacons as well, all solemnly vowing to live in a covenant of sacrificial love as brothers and sisters helping one another on the path to Union with the Blessed Trinity. See: http://lovecrucified.com/ ]

Following Pati’s lead, I have been meditating on the covenant in the last few days, noting this part in particular:  “My Lord, I surrender myself to the Holy Spirit and vow to be attentive to His promptings and movements in my soul, that I may come to a deeper knowledge of  Christ and of myself….”

In the last few years I have become so conscious of the Holy Spirit, so thirsty to come to know Him and “to be attentive to His promptings and movements in my soul.” But how?  How does this look in every day practice; and specifically, what does one do to accomplish this in real time?

I determined to review the posts I have already written on the Holy Spirit and see if I could gain some perspective and insight.  Then I saw this article a few days ago on a Catholic website, Spiritual Direction, which published an article:  “Gift of the Holy Spirit and the Divine Indwelling”:

“So, what does indwelling even mean? Indwelling is the supernatural presence of the Holy Spirit in a person who is in the state of grace.’ … Christians are temples of the living God when they choose to cooperate with grace. St. Augustine says, ‘Although God is everywhere wholly present, he does not dwell in everyone. It is not possible to say to all what the Apostle says: ‘Know you not that you are the temple of God and that the Spirit of God dwells in you?’ He that is everywhere does not dwell in all, and he does not dwell equally in those in whom he does dwell.’” [https://www.spiritualdirection.com/2017/10/19/gift-of-the-holy-spirit-and-the-divine-indwelling]

The Holy Spirit dwells within us from the moment of our baptism and will leave only when we are no longer in the state of grace.  But St. Augustine tells us here that “he does not dwell equally in those in whom he does dwell.”  What does that mean?

What can it mean but that if we ignore the Spirit of God who Indwells us, we do not grow in grace, and that the more we cooperate with grace, the deeper and more profound the Indwelling. What could deepen the Indwelling more than “to be attentive to His promptings and movements in my soul”? Now it is clear to us WHY we need to be attentive; but HOW?

I remember a wonderful post by Mark Mallett a year ago, RAISE YOUR SAILS. He combined three aspects of spirituality:  the “strong driving wind” of the Holy Spirit,  abandonment to the Divine Will through the duty of the moment, and embracing the Cross, especially as we face the Storm.

My reflections on his post led to my own post , HOLY WIND.  This morning I was deeply moved again by Mark’s explanation:

“At each and every moment, trust the Holy Spirit who blows where He wills according to My plan….

Each and every moment the Divine Will of God blows in your life within the present moment. All that is required of you is to simply raise the sails of trust into the Winds of the moment and, turning the rudder of obedience, do that which the moment requires, the duty of the moment. Just as the wind is invisible, so too, hidden within this moment is the power of God to transform, sanctify, and make you holy—yes, hidden behind the mundane, the ordinary, the unglamorous; behind crosses and consolations, the will of God is always there, always working, always active.”

To respond to every impulse and movement of the Holy Spirit in the Divine Indwelling is simply to “do that which the moment requires.” If we look at our life, often hectic and confusing, paying attention to the Holy Spirit seems impossible; but Mark tells us: hidden within this moment is the power of God.” Obedience is needed in just this moment, one moment at a time, whether mundane, ordinary, unglamorous.  We are blind; but “the will of God is always there, always working, always active” in the moment.  All I need is to “do that which the moment requires.”

Isn’t this the way Mary, the spouse of the Holy Spirit, led her entire life?  Each moment was filled with a simple FIAT.

In UNDER THE GAZE OF THE FATHER, Ven. Luis Martinez reminds Conchita:

“Do not forget that because of the mystical incarnation the Holy Spirit moves you almost constantly, not only in actions which seem important, but in all actions, even in ordinary and small ones. Are there perhaps common actions for souls that the Holy Spirit possesses and moves? Even though you are unaware of it, your divine Spouse constantly moves your soul, and places His divine seal on your activity” [p. 179].

What that means for us is that as living hosts, other Christs, the Holy Spirit constantly moves within us, even though we may be unaware of it. He is the constant Pulse of our life as he places His divine seal on every action, “even in ordinary and small ones.”  Like Mary, spouse of the Holy Spirit, we are to submit our will in abandonment and fiat in each moment; like Mary, we too will be spouses of the Holy Spirit, as we grow in grace before God and man, yearning to be utterly filled with the Divine Indwelling.

If the Holy Spirit is not the pulse of your life, then who or what is?

*******

LINKS TO MY OTHER POSTS ON THE HOLY SPIRIT:

“The Holy Spirit and His Seven Gifts” – https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/soul-food-talk-8-the-holy-spirit-and-his-seven-gifts/

“Touching the Holy Spirit—Part 1” – https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/2015/05/27/touching-the-holy-spirit-part-1/

“Touching the Holy Spirit—Part 2”- https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/2015/07/01/touching-the-holy-spirit-part-2/

“Sensuality and the Holy Spirit” – https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/2016/04/21/sensuality-the-holy-spirit/

“Unity in the Holy Spirit”-  https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/2016/07/09/unity-in-the-holy-spirit/

“The Holy Wind”- https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/2016/10/16/the-holy-wind/

POSTS ON THE SACRAMENT OF THE MOMENT:

“The Sacrament of the Moment”- https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/2015/11/18/the-sacrament-of-the-moment/

“Abandonment to Divine Providence”- https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/soul-food-talk-5-abandonment-to-divine-providence/

“My Little Tabernacle of Ordinary Life”- https://soulfoodministries.wordpress.com/2017/07/06/my-little-tabernacle-of-ordinary-life-from-ammies-testimony-on-being-a-living-host/